Dr. Todd Kupferman MD

South Florida ENT Associates, PA

954-974-4890

5800 Colonial Drive, Suite 105
 Margate, FL 33063

Our Locations


South Florida ENT Associates, PA
5800 Colonial Drive
Suite 105
Margate, Florida 33063
Phone: 954-974-4890
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3126 N. Federal Hwy.
Lighthouse Point, Florida 33064
Phone: 954-785-0900
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Patient Education

Todd Kupferman would like to be your partner in health care. Feel free to ask your questions and share your concerns with us. We will work with you to develop a wellness program for the care and treatment you need.

We welcome you to our practice and look forward to caring for you.

Todd Kupferman provides a full range of medical services including the following:


Sinusitis

Sinusitis (sinus infection) is a common medical condition that occurs when the sinus cavities in the upper skull become inflamed and do not drain properly. When the sinuses accumulate fluid and mucus due to an allergy or upper respiratory illness, their passages become obstructed. Without proper drainage, the impacted material becomes a fertile area for viruses, bacteria, or occasionally fungi to grow and create infection. Sinus inflammation causes pain and thickened mucus within the nasal cavity and may be chronic or acute. ...


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Snoring

Snoring is the sound created by vibrations of the soft palate when breathing is partially obstructed during sleep. Snoring is often a sign that the airway is partially blocked, usually by soft tissue in the throat. The flow of air causes the soft tissue to vibrate, which generates noise from the mouth or nose. While snoring is a common and usually harmless condition, it may sometimes indicate a serious health problem. Loud and habitual snoring can disrupt sleep and be irritating to sleep partners, resulting in relationship tensions. Snoring is more common in men than women and occurs more often in older people and those who are overweight. ...


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Sleep Apnea

Sleep apnea is a common sleep disorder that involves repeated breathing interruptions during sleep. These interruptions may occur hundred of times each night, and may be the result of structural abnormalities or brain malfunctions. During normal breathing, air passes through the nose, past the flexible structures in the back of the throat, including the soft palate, uvula and tongue. When a person is awake, the muscles hold this airway open. When they are asleep, these muscles relax and the airway usually stays open. Sleep apnea occurs when the upper airway and airflow are blocked, causing the oxygen levels to drop in both in the brain and the blood, resulting in shallow breathing or breathing pauses during sleep. ...


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Hearing Loss

Hearing loss is the sudden or gradual decrease in hearing. Hearing loss can be mild or severe, reversible, temporary or permanent, and may affect one or both ears. The most common cause of hearing loss is age, affecting up to 25 percent of people between the ages of 65 and 75 and up to 50 percent of those over the age of 75. Age-related hearing loss, known as presbycusis, results from changes in the ear which cause gradual hearing loss. Some individuals are hearing-impaired or deaf as a result of a congenital defect or because of an illness, such as Ménière's disease. ...


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Dysphagia

Dysphagia, also known as a swallowing disorder, is not an uncommon condition. Because the swallowing process is vital to gastrointestinal health, and the throat functions as a pathway for respiration as well as ingestion, swallowing disorders are not only uncomfortable, but may be life-threatening. There are two types of dysphagia: esophageal and oropharyngeal. Esophageal dysphagia refers to the sensation of food getting stuck in the base of the throat or chest after swallowing. Oropharyngeal dysphagia is caused by weakened throat muscles that make it difficult to move food from the mouth into the throat and esophagus when swallowing. Older individuals are more commonly affected by oropharyngeal dysphagia because of weaker teeth and throat muscles. In addition, people with neurological problems or nervous system disorders may also experience oropharyngeal dysphagia. Individuals who suffer from acid reflux or esophageal problems are more likely to suffer from esophageal dysphagia. ...


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Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

Velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) is the result of an improper closing of the velopharyngeal sphincter, the soft palate muscle, during speech. When this muscle does not close properly, air escapes through the nose instead of the mouth. During speech, VPI produces a nasal quality to the voice, known as hypernasality, and a snorting sound during the pronunciation of certain letters. The condition is usually diagnosed in children, although it may be diagnosed in older patients from developing countries where early diagnosis and treatment have not been available. ...


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Vocal Cord Paralysis

Vocal cord paralysis is a common disorder that occurs when nerve impulses to the larynx (commonly known as the voice box) are interrupted. This malfunction, which may occur in one or both vocal cords, not only affects the patient's ability to speak, but may interfere with normal breathing or swallowing. When a vocal cord does not open or close properly, food or liquids can slip into the trachea (windpipe). Vocal cord paralysis occurs more frequently in women, in those with certain neuromuscular disorders and in those who have undergone surgery of the throat or neck. ...


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Turbinate Reduction

Turbinate reduction is a surgical procedure to reduce the size of one or more of the small curved bones in the nose, known as turbinates, in order to open clogged nasal passages and improve breathing. There are three pairs of turbinates in the nose, classified as inferior, middle and superior. Their function is to warm, filter and humidify air as it circulates through the nose and into the lungs. Since they serve as filters, the turbinates help to protect the body from irritants and stave off infection. ...


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Balloon Sinuplasty

A balloon sinuplasty is a minimally invasive endoscopic procedure used to treat chronic sinusitis. Sinusitis is an inflammation of the lining within the paranasal sinuses. Once inflamed, the sinus cavities become a fertile ground for viruses, bacteria, and occasionally fungi to grow, resulting in infection. If it becomes chronic there may be a structural problem in the nose or sinuses. In those cases, a balloon sinuplasty may be recommended. ...


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Ear Infections

Ear infections, also known as otitis media, are one of the most common childhood medical problems. Ear infections are the most frequent cause of doctor visits for children. In fact, three out of four children in the United States will have at least one ear infection by the time they reach the age of three. ...


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Deviated Septum

A deviated septum is a common condition that involves a displacement of the septum, the wall that separates the nostrils, to one side of the nose. In adults, the septum is made of cartilage and bone, and helps to support the nose and its mucous membranes, and enables regular air flow. A deviated septum often develops as a result of an injury to the nose. This condition may cause one nasal passage to be smaller than the other, which can affect breathing if the difference is great enough. A deviated septum may also be the underlying cause of sinus problems, snoring or sleep apnea. ...


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Tinnitus

Tinnitus is a sensation of noise in the ears which may manifest itself as ringing, clicking, or hissing. Tinnitus is extremely common, experienced by as many as one in five individuals. Usually not a serious medical problem, tinnitus can nonetheless be extremely intrusive, affecting the patient's quality of life. It is often considered a symptom, caused by an underlying condition such as a problem with the inner or middle ear. Although it is often not a serious health problem, if tinnitus persists, it can cause fatigue, depression, anxiety, and problems with memory and concentration. ...


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Ear, Nose and Throat Allergies

Ear, nose and throat (ENT) allergies, like other types of allergies, are extremely common. Allergic reactions of all kinds are triggered by an abnormal response of the immune system when it mistakes an innocuous substance for a serious threat. While most allergic symptoms of this type are relatively mild, untreated ear, nose and throat allergies should not be ignored because they may lead to more significant medical problems. ...


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Tonsillitis

Tonsillitis is an inflammation of the tonsils, the two pads of lymphoid tissue at the back of the throat. The tonsils are part of the immune system, functioning as the first line of defense against pathogens entering the body through the nose or mouth. Because of their role is protecting the body against infections, they can easily become infected or inflamed themselves. The immune function of the tonsils diminishes after puberty, so tonsillitis, a common ailment in children, is not usually found in adults. Tonsillitis is most often caused by a virus or a bacteria, usually a type of Streptococcus, but may also result from a fungal or parasitic infection. Although usually not considered a serious disorder, severe or untreated tonsillitis may result in complications. ...


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Tonsillectomy

A tonsillectomy is the surgical removal of the tonsils, the two pads located at either side of the back of the throat. The tonsils serve as part of the immune system, a first line of defense for pathogens entering the mouth or nose. Because of their function, they may become infected or inflamed and, in some cases, may require surgical removal. Tonsillectomies are more commonly performed on children than adults. A tonsillectomy may be necessary when an individual has recurring episodes of tonsillitis or an ongoing infection that has not healed with other treatment. Surgery may also be required if enlarged tonsils block airways, leading to sleep apnea, swallowing problems or difficulty eating. Rarely, a tonsillectomy may be performed to treat a malignancy of the tonsils. ...


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Adenoidectomy

An adenoidectomy is the surgical removal of the adenoids, glands located behind the nose above the roof of the mouth. The function of the adenoids is to help fight ear, nose and throat infections by screening bacteria as they enter the body. At times, however, the adenoids themselves may become chronically infected and require removal; this condition is known as adenoiditis. ...


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Septoplasty

Septoplasty is a surgical procedure to correct defects or deformities of the septum, the partition between the two nostrils. Commonly, the procedure is performed to correct a deviated septum. While a small deviation of the septum is commonplace, if the condition is severe, it may impede airflow through the nostrils. This may cause difficulty breathing and poor nasal drainage from the sinuses, both of which are problematic. ...


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Tympanostomy

A tympanostomy is a surgical procedure during which a surgical opening is made in the eardrum, or tympanic membrane, in order to promote drainage of infected fluid from the middle ear and ear tubes are surgically implanted into the eardrum to promote ongoing drainage. After the tympanostomy, the tubes remain in place for several months. ...


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Pediatric Allergies

Children suffer with allergies in many of the same ways adults do, although since they are often less verbal, particularly when they are very young, they may not be able to describe their symptoms as accurately. Children may simply present as fussy, irritable or angry when suffering pain or discomfort they can't describe. Parents and other caregivers should be aware that children suffering from ear, nose and throat allergies are much more likely than adults to develop ear infections because of anatomical differences in the structure of their ears. ...


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Endoscopic Sinus Fracture Repair

A sinus fracture is a break in one of the facial bones in the area of the frontal sinuses. It frequently occurs in the lower portion of the forehead where the bone is thinner than it is around the upper forehead and therefore more susceptible to fracture. Often caused by a forceful impact to the face from a car accident, sports injury or similar type of trauma, a sinus fracture frequently requires a surgical procedure for proper repair. ...


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Spasmodic Dysphonia

Spasmodic dysphonia, also known as laryngeal dystonia, is a rare neurological disorder characterized by involuntary muscle spasms of the larynx (voice box). Spasmodic dysphonia causes the voice to break, or to have a tight, strained or strangled quality. Patients with spasmodic dysphonia may have difficulty communicating clearly. The disorder appears most often in people between 30 and 50 years of age, and more frequently in women. While the exact cause of spasmodic dysphonia is not always known, it is sometimes due to psychological stress, however, most cases result from a problem in the brain and nervous system. Spasmodic dysphonia is often a chronic condition. ...


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Audiologic Testing

Patients who suffer from hearing loss, or other hearing- and balance-related conditions, may benefit from audiologic testing. Comprehensive diagnostic exams can determine the causes and severity of, and best treatment for, hearing-related conditions. Audiologic tests are usually performed after other diagnostic tests have indicated the presence of a possible hearing problem or balance-related condition. ...


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Hearing Aids

Hearing aids are a common non-invasive treatment option for hearing loss. A hearing aid is a small electronic device worn in or behind the ear to amplify sounds. While hearing aids are useful in improving listening and communication, they do not cure hearing impairment or make the ear function normally. ...


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Balance Disorders

A balance disorder is a complex condition that causes unsteadiness and dizziness, and sensations of spinning, moving or floating. Part of the inner ear known as the labyrinth interacts with other body systems, including those of the eyes, bones and joints, to maintain balance. Normal balance requires the work of three sensory systems: the visual; the vestibular, which is located in the inner ear; and the somatosensory, which involves the muscular and skeletal systems. These systems, as well as the brain and nervous systems, can be the source of balance problems. When these systems do not function properly, vertigo, spinning, disorientation, trouble focusing the eyes, and poor balance may result. ...


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Earwax

Earwax, also known as cerumen, is a natural substance produced by glands in the ear canal to protect the eardrum from damage and infections. Earwax accumulates naturally, and then dries up and falls out of the ear canal. It functions to rid the ear of dust or sand particles, and repel water, which may contain bacteria and can cause infections. Without earwax, ears would be dry, itchy and unprotected. Earwax is made up of various different materials, and may be soft and almost liquid, or firm and solid. It is composed of dead skin cells, bacteria, sweat, oil and water. The production and clearing of earwax is natural and self-regulating so, under ordinary circumstances, the vast majority of people need never clean their ears. ...


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Copyright © 2019 by Dr. Todd Kupferman MD and Dr. Leonardo. All Rights Reserved.